And now…the Rest of their Bataan Story…

The title of this post plays on a famous line oft spoken by noted American radio commentator Paul Harvey.  But in this case we will apply it to the rest of the story after a photograph was taken.

This image of Air Corps has been seen in many places.  It was posted on this web log earlier as related to a story about the Airmen of Bataan, members of the US Army Air Corps and Philippine Army Air Corps who fought in the Bataan campaign.

Aircraft mechanics from the Headquarters Squadron, 24th Pursuit Group and 17th Pursuit Squadron pose with a Curtiss P-40E in a camouflaged revetment at Bataan Field, January, 1942.

Aircraft mechanics from the Headquarters Squadron, 24th Pursuit Group and 17th Pursuit Squadron pose with a Curtiss P-40E in a camouflaged revetment at Bataan Field, January, 1942.

As a reminder, here is the previous caption shared on this web log:

Aircraft mechanics from the Headquarters Squadron, 24th Pursuit Group and 17th Pursuit Squadron pose with a Curtiss P-40E in a camouflaged revetment at Bataan Field, January, 1942.  From left to right, front row: Charles Parman, Alan Waite, Brown Davidson, Henry McCracken, William Miller, Melvin Dixon, Lyall Dillon; middle row: Marcus Keithley, Jesse White, Ellis Holcomb, Chester Brown, Louis Tome, Michael Tardivo, Sid Wilkinson, John Dujenski; back row: Earl Akers, Richard Hunn, John O’Neal, Louis Myers, Clarence Hatzer, Henry Blair, William Alvis. Dujenski, Keithley, White and Wilkinson had just returned to aviation duty from the west coast fighting at Quinauan Point. (Photo courtesy of Ms. Linda Dahl, Lewiston, Idaho; mechanic’s full names via Mr. William Bartsch)

On The Battle of Bataan Public Group in Facebook, Mr. Josel Solomon posted this familiar picture, and Mr. James Erickson provided the reply that tells the rest of the wartime story of what happened to these men after the photograph was taken.

“They survived or died at exactly the proportions you’d expect. 22 men, 12 liberated, 10 died. Of those liberated, 8 in Japan, 2 at Mukden, 1 on Taiwan, and 1 at Cabanatuan. Of the 10 dead, 8 died in the PI, 2 at O’Donnell, 2 at Capas Tarlac, and 4 at Cabanatuan.

Charles Parman liberated Mukden Tottori Maru
Alan Waite died O’Donnell 25 May 42
Brown Davidson liberated Taihoku #6 Taiwan Nagara Maru
Henry McCracken, died Cabanatuan 18 June 42
William Miller, probable id. died Ichioka hospital 3 Feb 43 Nagato Maru
Melvin Dixon, died 7 July 1942 Cabanatuan
Lyall Dillon; liberated Hiroshima 6B Omine Canadian Inventor
Marcus Keithley, liberated at Cabanatuan
Jesse White, liberated Mukden Tottori Maru
Ellis Holcomb, died Capas Tarlac 4 June 42
Chester Brown, died Cabanatuan 4 March 43
Louis Tome, liberated Osaka 10B Maibara Hokusen Maru
Michael Tardivo, liberated Fukuoka 8B Nissyo Maru
Sid Wilkinson, liberated Tokyo 8B Motoyama Taikoku Maru
John Dujenski; died Cabanatuan 15 Aug 42
Earl Akers, died O’Donnell 7 May 42
Richard Hunn, liberated Hiroshima 6B Omine Canadian Inventor
John O’Neal, liberated Fukuoka 3B Yawata Nissyo Maru
Louis Myers, liberated Kamioka Tottori Maru to Japan
Clarence Hatzer, liberated Osaka 5B Tsuruga
Henry Blair, died Capas Tarlac 27 June 42
William Alvis. died Mukden 4 Feb 43 Tottori Maru”

It is always welcome when such information is shared to those who may have interest.  There are still so many people from the Bataan campaign, Filipino and American, whose experience in and fate from the Bataan campaign remain unknown.

But family members, friends and those interested are still looking, ever hopeful, for information to bring them closure, because the unresolved absence of a loved one leaves a hole in the heart.

And now, as Paul Harvey used to say, you know…the rest of the story…

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